Write on Site

Regular price $ 115

Monday, July 18, through Friday, July 22

11 am to 2 pm

Ages 12 to 17

Immerse yourself in site-specific art at The Aldrich and you’ll have no lack of writing inspiration! Guided by Barb Jennes—poet, writer, and currently an eighth-grade English teacher in Ridgefield—you’ll spend the week exploring the installations, sculptures (indoors and out), and “play-with-it” interactive artwork of four outstanding contemporary artists. Then, you'll express your deep engagement with the creative experience in writing for various literary media. Collaborate, share, and create with other serious young writers. A selection of the participants’ writing will be showcased in the galleries and on the Museum’s website and social media, offering Aldrich visitors a unique perspective—yours!—into the current series of exhibitions.

 

About Barb Jennes

After an early career in poetry followed by twenty-five years as a professional writer and editor for corporations, ad agencies, and magazines, Barb Jennes transferred her passion and skills to teaching middle-school English. According to Jennes, teaching is the ultimate creative career, requiring insight and intuition into what makes the adolescent mind engage and expand. Jennes was a summa cum laude graduate of the State University of New York at Albany, where she majored in English with a creative writing focus. In addition, she holds an MS degree in Educational Curriculum. She has led many creative writing workshops for teens and adults over the years. When not teaching or writing, Jennes enjoys visiting contemporary art museums across the country.

Site Lines: Four Solo Exhibitions Engaging Place includes specially commissioned works by David Brooks, Kim Jones, Peter Liversidge, and Virginia Overton that utilize not only The Aldrich’s galleries, but also the sculpture garden, outdoor terraces, and various public locations in Ridgefield. Exhibition elements include a disassembled agricultural combine whose elements pass through the Museum’s first floor into the surrounding landscape (Brooks), a grove of trees transformed into a dramatic biomorphic sculpture (Jones), a cannonball embedded in a gallery wall that references the Revolutionary War cannonball that was fired by the British into the wall of the Keeler Tavern (Liversidge), and an interactive, twelve-foot hanging swing made from a large tree felled on the Museum’s campus (Overton).